Artist Hajime Sorayama and the art world of taboos

Over 50 years of his career, artist Hajime Sorayama – who once resonated with the impressive fembot statue in Kim Jones’ Dior Men Pre-fall 2019 – still challenges the limit between the pure beauty of women and sexual norms in society.

Artist Hajime Sorayama identified himself as an illustrator instead of an artist. According to him, illustrating is a process that is “drawn from logical thinking, rather than reflecting ordinary hate feelings”. Sorayama is famous for the art school he calls “surrealism.” Referring to him, the art lovers and even the fans of the science fiction genre often think of fembot illustrations (female robot figures) that have a bit of mixed charm. Very charming fascination of female body curves and sensual lustful inspiration.

At the age of seven, the endless creativity of this artist is still warmly received by fans at art exhibitions around the world and through collaborations with famous fashion brands that Dior Men Pre-fall 2019 is a typical example. In this article, let us look back on the artistic journey of artist Hajime Sorayama.

Touching the painting lane
Artist Hajime Sorayama was born on February 22, 1947 in Imabari City, Ehime Prefecture, Japan. Before he realized his passion for illustration, he went through puberty with many different career orientations. He once shared that his predestined relationship with painting only came when one of his high school teachers realized his talent in drawing through Playboy-inspired paintings and suggested it to him.

While studying majoring Greek and English literature at the school at Shikoku Gakuin University, Sorayama published the first illustrated magazine called Pink Journal. However, his ideas and inspiration in this work faced harsh criticism from lecturers and students for being “too sexy” compared to the views of the majority of Japanese at that time.

After that event, he moved to Tokyo’s Chuo Art School completely to pursue painting. He graduated at 21 years old and worked for an advertising agency before becoming a freelance illustrator at the age of 25. At 31, while working with a friend, he produced the first robot illustration inspired by the C-3PO character of the Star Wars series.

Challenge the line between exquisite beauty and vulgarity
Being creative in his own art philosophy, Hajime Sorayama gradually shaped his personal illustration style through a series of fembot works that broke the line between fiction, femininity and sensual satisfaction. In the context of a Japanese society that is still wary of body-exposed images and content, Sorayama has gradually broken that barrier with his determination to pursue the school he described. two words “surreal”.