Seto Celadon art masterpiece

Kumiko Murai and father, Norio. Norio’s phone # 0561-48-1688. Wife Tsumako. Kumiko’s phone #: 090-3588-7072; 0568-95-5288; Chuodai 5-2-21; Kasugai-shi, Aichi-ken.

Seto Celadon art porcelain (瀬戸青瓷) has become world famous since the Meiji period when the Japanese spent more than 7% of this product exported to the US market. Beyond Sato Ruri (瀬戸瑠 璃) or Sometsuke (染付) porcelain, featuring the blue and white glaze of noble royal blue, Seto Celadon is as vivid as a picture of flowers and birds. 3D rendering on a jade-green glaze background.
Seto is known as the only center of pottery in medieval enamelling and became famous in Japan since the 13th century. Owari (or Seto) first appeared in connection with ceramics in the Nihon epic. 9th century Kōki (日本 後 紀) In the beginning, Seto pottery art was born to meet the needs of tea parties from Zen masters such as Myōan Eisai (明菴榮西, 1141-1215) when studying abroad in China. , brought the tea varieties to grow and stimulate the development of pure Japanese tea (茶道).
During the Kamakura period (92, 1192-1333), Seto pottery almost mimicked the art of Celadon blue celadon pottery (青瓷) and the dark brown ceramic Tenmoku (天 目) in the Southern Song Dynasty (南宋, 1127-1279). . During the Muromachi period (室町, 1337-1573), Seto yeast was further refined, developed in various styles and modeled for tea ceremony utensils. Since the Korean potter Yi Sam-pyeong (李参平, died 1655) was abducted and brought back to Kyushu (九州), the discovery of kaolin white clay in Hizen Province helped him become the first Japanese porcelain profession to produce. made in 1616.
The Japanese began producing Sometsuke porcelain, imitating Western designs and serving for export from the 17th century. The Tokugawa shogunate (1603-1867) imposed a nationwide policy (鎖 国) in 1633, resulting in discontinued porcelain exports to 1757 and then to an end. History records the 14th shogun Tokugawa Iemochi (徳川家茂, 1858-1866) in an effort to give Queen Victoria a tin of Seto porcelain food in 1866 until handing over power to Emperor Meiji in 1867.
The porcelain arrived in the Seto region quite late in the early 19th century, consisting of mainly Sometsuke, Ruri and Celadon porcelain called Shinsei-yaki (真成焼, new and molded porcelain) to distinguish it from Hongyo-yaki, (本行焼, traditional ceramics). Ruri specializes in religious goods and offers Western-style tableware, dishes and vases. Sometsuke and Celadon are manufactured as moist tea utensils, deer wine, vases, bonsai pots (盆栽) with oriental characteristics, captivating collectors’ passion for hunting as it continually wins awards. Grand prize at the Paris exhibition for a short time from 1900 to 1901.